Courses

Primary courses


MPHY 500 A,B,C Medical Physiology:
The course offers the basic principles of organ system physiology. Through lectures, demonstrations, conferences and laboratory work; students receive a quantitative and integrated concept of subcellular, cellular and organ system function. For graduate students majoring in physiology, this course is a prerequisite for all other graduate courses.
  • Fall, Winter Spring quarters: 14 credits. (Course Director, Dr. McCormack)

 GPHY 522 Topics in Physiology: The purpose of the Topics in Physiology course is to provide state-of-the-art knowledge about the physiological basis for understanding numerous pathophysiological situations in humans. The subjects of this course encompass from basic aspects of call physiology to complex and interrelated clinical situations in which normal physiology has been altered.

  • Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters, 5 credits. (Course Director: Dr. Rasgado-Flores) Scheduled Class Time: 2 hr. lecture/week

Electives Offered


MPHY610 Renal Cell Biology: Students are taught fundamental processes of renal physiology and pathophysiology at the cellular level. An examination of recent literature and student presentations are emphasized.

  •  Winter Quarter, 2 credits. (Course Director, Dr. Peterson)

GPHY545 Physiology of Acid-Base Metabolism: Group discussions of assigned readings on the mechanisms of body defenses against changes in acid-base balance

  • Winter Quarter, 2 credits. (Course Director, Dr. Peterson)

 GPHY-512 Phys of Autonomic Nervous System: An advanced course with the material covering autonomic nervous regulation and integration of vital functions such as respiration, circulation and temperature regulation.  Seminar/Discussion.

  •  Fall Quarter, 2 credits. (Course Director, Dr. Sukowski)

 GPHY505 Physiology Seminar: Students, staff and invited guests present their current research programs in physiology for discussion and analysis.

  •  Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters, 1 credit/quarter

GMTD711Journal Club: Students and staff present a review of current research literature in physiology, with emphasis on critical analysis of methodology and evaluation of results and conclusions.

  •   Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters, 1 credit/quarter

MPHY615 Physiology of the Liver: The normal functions of the liver are discussed as well as the experimental techniques used in the study of the liver. Various pathologies of the liver are presented and related to the disturbances of the normal physiology.

  • Winter Quarter, two lecture hours per week 2 credits. (Course Director: Dr. Sukowski )

 MPHY609 Cardiovascular Pathophysiology: Clinical aspects of cardiovascular function are emphasized, e.g. heart sounds and murmurs, electrocardiogram, monitoring of central venous pressure, and cardiac function curves.  Prerequisite:  Medical Physiology (MPHY 500 A, B, C) or its equivalent.

 MPHY620 Integrative Physiology: A Self-Study Course (10 students): Students increase their capabilities to think through complex, integrative type, physiological clinical situations, improve performance on data interpretation problems and better understand the physiological rationale for appropriate corrective measures, and better understand the pathophysiology involved in many disease states.

  •   Winter Quarter, two lecture hours per week 2 credits. (Course Director: Dr. Sukowski )

 GPHY534 Teaching Methods: To provide graduate students with practical experience in teaching physiology, advanced students present lectures and assist in the planning and direction of laboratory and discussion sessions and in the presentation of technical material under careful supervision of the staff

  • Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters, 1-2 credits Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters, 1-2 credits

GPHY535 Doctoral Research in Physiology: Research hours performed following submission and approval of a research project by the candidate's Thesis Committee. Hours and units of credit to be arranged.

  •  5-15 credits/quarter

MPHY624 Pulmonary Pathophysiology: The biophysics of pulmonary mechanics and gas transport are presented as a basis for evaluating pulmonary function. Modern pulmonary function-testing equipment is utilized in the laboratory, and an emphasis is placed on recognizing abnormal lung volume and air flows.  Prerequisite:  Medical Physiology (MPHY 500 A, B, C) or its equivalent.

 MPHY626 Research in Physiology: Students are given the opportunity to become involved in significant physiological research. In doing so, the student gains experience in designing experiments; operating modern research equipment; gathering meaningful data; evaluating experimental results; and preparing the results for publication. All quarters.

 MPHY801 Research in Physiology: This elective provides students with an opportunity to become involved in significant physiological research. In doing so, the student gains experience in designing experiments, operating modern research equipment, gathering meaningful data, evaluating experimental results, and preparing the results for publication. The student selects an area of interest and a mentor. The student discusses with the mentor the nature, feasibility and specific objectives of the research project.

CPR for Boards - March and April: Taught by: Dr. Pullen, Program Director; Dr. Kim, Dr. McCormack, Dr. Peterson, Dr. Rasgado-Flores, Dr. Sukowski and Dr. Ebihara.

 Review Session for Sophomores for USMLE (Step 1) - March and April: Taught by: Dr. McCormack; Dr. Peterson, and Dr. Sukowski.

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