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William Agbor-Baiyee, PhD

Associate Professor & Assistant Dean for Educational Research and Student Learning

Dr. William Agbor-Baiyee is Associate Professor and Assistant Dean for Educational Research and Student Learning at Chicago Medical School (CMS), Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. He directs the CMS House and Learning Community Program, whose mission is to enhance the learning environment and success of medical students through curricular and co-curricular learning and engagement with faculty. He is Course Director for Clinical Reflections, a course series for first, second, third and fourth year medical students. He is Editor-in-Chief of Synapses, the creative journal of Chicago Medical School. 

He has previously served in various administrative or faculty roles at Indiana University School of Medicine and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. 

Dr. Baiyee serves on the Professionalism Committee, Student Evaluation and Promotions Committee, and Professionalism Curriculum Subcommittee of Chicago Medical School. He also serves on the Learning Communities Institute Council.

Dr. Baiyee holds a Bachelor of Science (Honors) in Cellular and Molecular Biology from Ball State University. He also earned a Master of Public Affairs in Management, Master of Science in Education and Doctor of Philosophy in Higher Education from Indiana University.

He has been recipient of several awards for his academic and civic contributions. He has completed the Harvard Macy Institute Program for Leaders in Healthcare Education. He has been a holder or co-holder grants from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Health and Human Services. He served on the Indiana Health Care Professional Development Commission.   

Dr. Agbor-Baiyee enjoys advising learners to help them achieve their objectives in academia. His academic interests focus on understanding the problems inherent in the educational process and learner development, including professionalism, professional identity formation, reflective practice, engagement in academic learning environments and use of learning communities in medical education.