Skip to Main Content

David S. Kosson, PhD

Professor

Dr. David Kosson obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin - Madison after completion of an internship at the SUNY Health Sciences Center in Syracuse, New York. He subsequently worked as an Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro from 1990 through December 1, 1994. He joined RFUMS in December, 1994. His research interests focus on psychopathy. Dr. Kosson teaches courses in Personality, Counseling, and Psychotherapy and in Theoretical Psychopathology within the Department. He is involved in a number of professional activities including serving as president of the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy from 2011 to 2013 and as president of the Aftermath: Surviving Psychopathy Foundation. He is licensed in North Carolina.

Are you a prospective graduate student?
Dr. Kosson will be considering student applications for the 2017/2018 academic year.

Research

My research interests are in the psychological mechanisms that differentiate psychopathic from nonpsychopathic inmates and normal adults, including attentional function, emotional processing, and interpersonal behavior, and in the developmental processes that contribute to adult psychopathy. Several ongoing studies test competing hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying psychopathic offenders' cognitive and emotional deficits. Other studies examine whether subgroups of offenders are characterized by distinct emotional and cognitive deficits. Some of my related interests include interrelations between cognition, motivation, and emotion, including emotion regulation; mechanisms underlying interpersonal approaches to the assessment of personality disorder, and studies examining the interpersonal manifestations of psychopathy, Borderline Personality Disorder, Narcissistic Personality Disorder, and Schizoid Personality Disorder are now in progress.

Research Lab

Recent Lab News

  • John Anderson and Dr. Kosson’s paper titled "Evaluation of a Cognitive Intervention for High-Risk Probationers" was accepted for presentation at the American Psychology-Law Society (APA Division 41) conference in Seattle, WA in March, 2017.
  • Congratulations to Kristen Klipfel for receiving the College of Health Professions Clinical Education Award - Psychology Ph.D., an award which recognizes the graduate student with the most outstanding performance in clinical training.
  • Congratulations to Erica Christian on the publication of a manuscript reporting her masters’ thesis findings. Along with coauthors Christine Meltzer and Linda Thede, her manuscript “The relationship between early life events, parental attachment, and psychopathic tendencies in adolescent detainees” is now in press at Child Psychiatry and Human Development.
  • Congratulations to Erica Christian and Melanie Chinchilla on securing highly competitive Bureau of Prisons (BOP) internships for the 2016-2017 training year.

Current Projects

  • Individual Differences in Personality: This project is designed to understand the personality traits and attitudes that contribute to antisocial and criminal behaviors. Using interviews, questionnaires, we try to understand the attitudes and experiences that lead to differences in personality traits and in personality disorders associated with antisocial behaviors. We also use laboratory tasks to examine emotional processing, cognitive processing, and problem-solving strategies that are more adaptive and that are maladaptive. Our focus is to identify relationships between individual differences in cognitive and emotional processing and in the attitudes and experiences associated with personality pathology.
  • Neural Substrate of Cognitive and Emotional Deficits in Psychopathy: This project, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, and conducted in collaboration with Dr. Kent Kiehl, Dr. Carla Harenski, and Dr. Vince Calhoun of the University of New Mexico and the Mind Research Network, is designed to provide simultaneous tests of three contemporary perspectives for cognitive and emotional deficits of psychopathic offenders. The project is designed to evaluate predictions of the left hemisphere activation hypothesis, the response modulation hypothesis, and the paralimbic hypothesis. The grant ended in October 2016, and we are currently analyzing the data and writing manuscripts that report the findings.
  • Emotion regulation deficits associated with early trauma among low income, minority preschoolers: This is a collaborative project with Dr. Cecilia Martinez-Torteya at DePaul University which is funded by a consortium at Rosalind Franklin University and DePaul University. We are examining relationships between exposure to trauma and signs of psychopathology. In addition, we are examining whether parenting and the ability to regulate emotion are helpful in reducing the impact of exposure to trauma. We are also exploring longitudinal associations between early trauma exposure, emotion regulation deficits, and psychosocial functioning.

 

Research Lab Members

Current doctoral students

Kristin A. Ridder, M.S. Kristin is an 8th year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. Her master’s thesis examined subtypes of youth offenders with psychopathic traits. She is currently completing a dissertation study addressing whether relationships between childhood abuse and adult violence are mediated by individual differences in social cognition and emotion regulation.

Erica J. Christian, M.S. Erica is a 7th year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. She received her Bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in 2004 where she majored in Psychology and in Law & Criminology. Following graduation, she worked as a Research Coordinator in an adolescent neuropsychology lab before enrolling in Rosalind Franklin’s doctoral program. Her clinical training thus far has included practica at a community mental health center, Youth Build, and at the Lovell Federal Health Care Center working with veterans. Currently, her clinical interests involve adult forensic assessment. Her research interests relate to early environmental factors in the development of psychopathy and emotional processing in psychopathic offenders. Erica is currently completing an internship with the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

Christine L. Meltzer, M.S. Christine is a 7th year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. She attended Grand Valley State University where she earned her Bachelor's degree in Psychology. Her research interests relate primarily to psychopathy and aggression but also include studying the etiology of psychopathy. Christine completed her master's thesis in 2015 which focused on the relationship between psychopathy and reactive aggression in youth offenders.

Melanie A. Chinchilla, M.S. Melanie is a 6th year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of San Francisco with a BA in Psychology. After that, Melanie worked with various at-risk populations and has an interest in public health. Her research interests focus on personality disorders (specifically psychopathy, antisocial personality disorder, and borderline personality disorder), environmental factors, and externalizing behavior in adult and adolescent populations. Melanie is currently working on her dissertation which examines relationships between antisocial personality disorder, psychopathy, risk behavior, and health outcomes. Melanie is currently completing an internship with the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

Kristen M. Klipfel, M.S. Kristen is a 5th year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. She received her B.A. in Psychology and Italian from the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Her master's thesis examined grandiosity and superficiality as distinct constructs in psychopathy and narcissism and is currently under review for publication. Kristen presented a paper talk at the 2015 SSSP conference on the topic of shared and unique relationships between psychopathy facet scores and DSM-5 personality disorders in a male jail sample.  Kristen wrote a manuscript that includes these findings, and it is currently under review for publication. Her dissertation is an extension of this study and is looking at these relationships in three alternative samples: a Canadian community sample, a United States prison sample, and a European forensic psychiatric sample. Kristen is in the process of applying to APA-approved internships in forensic psychology for the 2017-2018 training year.

Jami Mach, M.S.
Jami is a 5th year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. She completed her masters thesis in 2015 and is currently completing a dissertation study examining relationships between intimate partner violence and psychopathy.

Hillary Gorin. Hillary is a 4th year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. She graduated from the Marquette University with a B.A. in Psychology. Broadly, Hillary is interested in the developmental mechanisms involved in psychopathic trait development. More specifically, she is interested in emotion regulation processes, biological predispositions, and environmental factors which contribute to the development of psychopathic traits (as related to her master's thesis and future dissertation). Hillary is involved in a grant-funded study with DePaul University concerning emotion regulation deficits with early trauma among low-income, minority preschoolers. Her clinical work has spanned child and adult populations in a variety of settings, including the UIC Disruptive Behavior Clinic, Lake County Probation - Psychological Services, and Child and Adolescent Behavioral Services (CABS). She is especially clinically interested in the treatment of trauma and related emotional and behavioral difficulties.

Allison R. Brown. Allison is a 3rd year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. She attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she received her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Sociology with an emphasis on Criminal Justice. Her current research interests include emotion regulation in psychopathy, aggression, and the role of empathy in the development and expression of psychopathy. Currently, she is working on her master’s thesis which focuses on the relationship between psychopathy, empathy, and aggression and the role of interpersonal identification in this relationship.

John R. Anderson. John is a 3rd year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. He graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with a B.S. in Psychology and a B.A. in Spanish, and also spent a year at the Universitat de Barcelona. Broadly, John is interested in how psychopathy plays a role in the etiology of criminal behavior. More specifically, he is interested in how psychopathy manifests across different ethnic groups and how this can inform understanding of criminal offending. John is also involved in a grant-funded study with DePaul University concerning emotional regulation deficits with early trauma among low-income, minority preschoolers.


Zachary Resch.
Zachary is a 3rd year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program.

 

Sara Millspaugh. Sara is a 2nd year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. She graduated from the University of Georgia with a BS in Psychology and an AB in Criminal Justice and Sociology. Following graduation, she worked as a Research Assistant at the University of Virginia's Institute of Law, Psychiatry, and Public Policy. Her primary interests lie in the relationship between psychopathy and externalizing behavior, emotion regulation, the etiology and conceptualization of personality disorders, successful psychopathy, and gender differences in psychopathy. She is also interested in other general forensic psychology topics.  Sara is currently working on her master’s thesis which will examine the relationship between psychopathy and the likelihood of being convicted of a crime.

Courtney N. Beussink, M.S. Courtney is a 1st year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. She completed her B.S. degree in Neuroscience at Saint Louis University and her M.S. degree in Experimental Psychology at Georgia Southern University. Her master’s thesis examined the utility of perspective taking in increasing empathy-related responses for individuals lower and higher in the callous affect traits of psychopathy.  Her primary interests involve the relationship between psychopathy and emotion, especially the mechanisms underlying the emotional deficits associated with psychopathy.

Current Master’s Students 

Paige Schrempp. Paige is a 2nd year student in the Clinical Counseling Master's program. She graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with dual degrees in Biology (Neurobiology emphasis) and Psychology. Her primary interests include the relationship between psychopathy and externalizing behaviors, such as violence, criminality, and substance abuse, neurological and environmental etiological factors, and female psychopathy. In the future, she plans to obtain her PhD in Counseling Psychology with an emphasis in offender advocacy and development of effective treatments for offenders.


Elianna Lozoya
. Elianna is a 2nd year student in the Clinical Counseling Master's program.

 

Elena Vaudreuil. Elena is a 1st year student in the Clinical Counseling Master’s program. She recently graduated with her Bachelor’s degree at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she majored in psychology. She is interested in the study of psychopathy, with a concentration on moral reasoning with psychopathic individuals. She is currently working on a project analyzing recidivism in psychopathic inmates. She has had experience working with adult forensic populations at the Mendota Mental Health Institute in Madison, Wisconsin including work on therapeutic alliances, conducting research, inpatient treatment and tutoring and teaching classes to patients.

Research Lab Alumni

 Chelsea L. Brieman, Ph.D. Dr. Brieman received her Ph.D. in 2016 from RFUMS. She is currently working as a psychologist at the Federal Correctional Institution in Oxford, Wisconsin. She is primarily interested in the study of environmental/familial factors associated with the development of psychopathic traits. In addition, her recent research focus has been on psychopathy and its effects on significant others. She is also interested in the development and manifestation of other personality disorders. 

Sarah L. Hampton, Ph.D. Dr. Hampton received her Ph.D. in 2016 from RFUMS. She also obtained M.S. degrees in Clinical Psychology and in Health Administration while attending RFUMS. She is currently a Staff Psychologist at the United States Penitentiary in Marion, Illinois. Her research and clinical work has spanned child and adult populations in a variety of settings. Her primary focus is the forensic application of clinical psychology. Sarah's research interests include attributional biases exhibited by those with maladaptive personality traits, attachment problems and their relationship to psychopathology, the role of parenting practices in the development of psychopathology, the experience of shame and guilt for those with psychopathic traits, and the forensic assessment of incarcerated individuals. She is currently working toward licensure.

Cody V. Schraft, Ph.D. Dr. Schraft received her Ph.D. in 2014 from RFUMS. Cody is currently at La Rabida Children’s Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. Her research interests are focused on the relationship between environmental factors associated with childhood abuse, maltreatment, and trauma and the presentation of externalizing psychopathology, including conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, reactive attachment disorder, and psychopathic traits in youth populations.

Nastasia R. E. Riser, Ph.D. Dr. Riser received her Ph.D. in 2013 from RFUMS. She is currently at the VA San Diego Healthcare System in San Diego, California. Her research and clinical interests are focused on understanding the mechanisms underlying various personality syndromes (including psychopathy, antisocial personality disorder, and borderline personality disorder). She also has interests in self-injurious, suicidal, and other maladaptive behaviors that may be used to regulate affect but which may lead to avoidance and exacerbate anxiety and mood difficulties. She is interested in understanding the development, course, and treatment of personality disorders and co-morbid conditions, and is especially interested in emotion regulation in individuals with personality disorders. Her dissertation study examined whether individuals with psychopathic traits are characterized by difficulties in emotion regulation.

Michael Brook, Ph.D. Dr. Brook received his Ph.D. in 2011 from RFUMS. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. Dr. Brook's primary clinical interest is in neuropsychological assessment, particularly as applied to the justice system, including issues of fitness, mitigation, risk assessment, and neuropsychological Independent Medical Evaluations (IMEs) of criminal and civil litigants. He is also interested in neuropsychological evaluation of patients with epilepsy, brain tumors, and other conditions affecting cognitive function including cerebrovascular, metabolic, autoimmune, and genetic disorders. His research focuses on investigating the neuropsychological correlates of interpersonal violence and psychopathy, as well as neurocognition in patients undergoing neurosurgical intervention.

Zach Walsh, Ph.D. Dr. Walsh received his Ph.D. in 2008 from RFUMS and completed a clinical internship and a research fellowship at the Brown University Centre for Alcohol and Addiction Studies. He is currently an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of British Columbia and Co-Director for the Centre for the Advancement of Psychological Science and Law. He is a registered clinical psychologist whose research has been supported by the Canadian Institute of Health Research, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Health Canada, BC Interior Health Authority, the Peter Wall Endowment and the American Psychological Association. He leads two distinct labs focused on Personality and Violence and Therapeutic, Recreational, and Problematic Substance Use.

Marc Swogger, Ph.D. Dr. Swogger received his Ph.D. in 2006 from RFUMS. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center. His research focuses primarily on psychopathy and violence among criminal offenders. He studies factors that moderate the relationships between psychopathic traits and key public health outcomes, including general interpersonal violence, intimate partner violence, suicidal behavior, and criminal recidivism. Dr. Swogger has begun a randomized clinical trial to study how personality heterogeneity impacts the efficacy of a substance use intervention among offenders.

Research Lab Links

The Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy
Robert Hare’s website for the study of Psychopathy
Paul Frick’s Developmental Psychopathology Lab website
The Aftermath: Surviving Psychopathy Foundation

Research Lab Photos

Lab Meetings in Montreal






Lab Meetings in New Orleans

 





 

Chicago Pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recent lab presentations

Gorin, H., Miller, S. A., Brown, A. R., Vitaro, F., Séguin, J. R., Fontaine, N. M. G., Xu, Q., Hodgins, S., Boivin, M., Tremblay, R. E., & Kosson, D. S. (2015, June). Predicting Psychopathic Traits in Middle Childhood from Negative Affect in the First Two Years of Life. Poster presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy, Chicago, IL

Gorin, H., Miller, S. A., Brown, A. R., Vitaro, F., Séguin, J. R., Fontaine, N. M. G., Xu, Q., Hodgins, S., Boivin, M., Tremblay, R. E., & Kosson, D. S. (2015, June). Psychopathic Traits in Young Children: A Stable One-Factor Model. Poster presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy, Chicago, IL

Klipfel, K.M. (2015, June). Psychopathy and its relations with personality disorders among offenders. Paper orally presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy, Chicago, IL. 

Klipfel, K.M. (2015, June). Grandiosity and superficiality as distinct constructs in psychopathy and narcissism. Poster presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy, Chicago, IL.

Selected recent Publications

Publications addressing Cognitive or Emotional Dysfunction in Psychopathy

Pera-Guardiola, V., Batalla, I., Bosque, J., Kosson, D., Pifarré, J., Hernández-Ribas, R., Goldberg, X., Contreras-Rodríguez, O., Menchón, J. M., Soriano-Mas, C., & Cardoner, N. (in press). Modulatory effects of psychopathy on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test performance in male offenders with Antisocial Personality Disorder. Psychiatry Research, 235, 43-48. doi:10.1016/j.psychres.2015.12.003. 

Pera-Guardiola, V., Contreras-Rodríguez, O., Batalla, I., Kosson, D., Menchón, J. M., Pifarré, J., Bosque, J., Cardoner, N., & Soriano-Mas, C. (2016). Brain structural correlates of emotion recognition in psychopaths. PLoS ONE, 11, e0149807. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0149807.

Brook, M., Brieman, C. L., & Kosson, D. S. (2013). Emotional processing in Psychopathy Checklist-assessed psychopathy: A review of the literature. Clinical Psychology Review, 33, 979-995.

Brook, M., & Kosson, D. S. (2013). Impaired cognitive empathy in criminal psychopathy: Evidence from a laboratory measure of empathic accuracy. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 122, 156-166.

Riser, R. E., & Kosson, D. S. (2013). Criminal behavior and cognitive processing in male offenders with antisocial personality disorder with and without co-morbid psychopathy. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, 4, 332-340.

Bagley, A. D., Abramowitz, C. S., & Kosson, D. S. (2009). Vocal affect recognition and psychopathy: Converging findings across traditional and cluster analytic approaches to assessing the construct. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 118, 388-398.

Kosson, D. S., Miller, S. K., Byrnes, K. A., & Leveroni, C. (2007). Testing neuropsychological hypotheses for cognitive deficits in psychopathic criminals: A study of global-local processing. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 13, 267-276.

Lopez, M. L., Kosson, D. S., Weissman, D. H., & Banich, M. T. (2007). Interhemispheric integration in psychopaths. Neuropsychology, 21, 82-93.

Publications addressing Antisocial Behavior, Crime and Violence associated with Psychopathy

Walsh, Z., Hendricks, P. S., Smith, S., Kosson, D. S., Thiessen, M. S., Lucas, P., & Swogger, M. T. (2016). Hallucinogen use and intimate partner violence: Prospective evidence consistent with protective effects among men with histories of problematic substance use. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 30, 601-607. doi:10.1177/0269881116642538.

Chinchilla, M. A., & Kosson, D. S. (2016). Psychopathic traits moderate relationships between parental warmth and adolescent antisocial and other high-risk behaviors. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 43, 722-738. doi:10.1177/0093854815617216.

Goldstein, D.A., Cantos, A.L., Brenner, L.H., Verborg, R.J., & Kosson, D.S. (2016). Perpetrator type moderates the relationship between severity of intimate partner violence and recidivism. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 43, 879-898. doi:10.1177/0093854815616841.

Schraft, C. V., Kosson, D. S., & McBride, C. K. (2013). Exposure to violence within home and community environments and psychopathic tendencies in adolescents. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 40, 1027-1043.

Salvador-Silva, R., Vasconcellos, S. J. L., Davoglio, T. R., Gauer, G. J. C., & Kosson, D. S. (2012). Psicopatia e comportamentos interpessoais em detentos: um estudo correlacional. (Psychopathy and interpersonal behavior in detainees: A correlational study.)  Avaliação Psicológica, 11, 239-245.

Swogger, M. T., Walsh, Z., Kosson, D. S., Cashman-Brown, S., & Caine, E. D. (2012). Childhood physical abuse and later perpetration of intimate partner violence: The moderating role of psychopathic traits. Criminal Justice and Behavior.

Swogger, M. T., Walsh, Z., Lejuez, C. W., & Kosson, D. S. (2010). Psychopathy and risk-taking among criminal offenders. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 37, 439-452.

Walsh, Z., Swogger, M. T., & Kosson, D. S. (2009). Psychopathy and instrumental violence: Facet level relationships. Journal of Personality Disorders, 23, 416-424.

Walsh, Z., & Kosson, D. S. (2008). Psychopathy and violence: The importance of factor level interactions. Psychological Assessment, 20, 114-120.

Swogger, M. T., Walsh, Z., & Kosson, D. S. (2007). Domestic violence and psychopathic traits in antisocial offenders. Aggressive Behavior, 33, 1-8.

Walsh, Z., Allen, L. C., & Kosson, D. S. (2007). Beyond social deviance: Substance-specific relationships with PCL-R facets. Journal of Personality Disorders, 21, 273-288.

Walsh, Z., & Kosson, D. S. (2007). Psychopathy and violent crime: A prospective study of the influence of socioeconomic status and ethnicity. Law and Human Behavior, 31, 209-229.

Walsh, Z., Swogger, M. T., Walsh, T., & Kosson, D. S. (2007). Psychopathy and violence: Increasing specificity. Netherlands Journal of Psychology, 63, 136-143.

Publications addressing the Nature of Psychopathic Traits in Youth and Adulthood

Christian, E. J., Meltzer, C. L., Thede, L. L., & Kosson, D. S. (in press). The relationship between early life events, parental attachment, and psychopathic tendencies in adolescent detainees. Child Psychiatry and Human Development.

Korponay, C., Pujara, M.S., Deming, P., Philippi, C., Decety, J., Kosson, D.S., Kiehl, K.A., & Koenigs, M. (in press). Impulsive-antisocial dimension of psychopathy linked to enlargement and abnormal functional connectivity of the striatum. Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.

Kosson, D.S., Gacono, C., Klipfel, K.M., & Bodholdt, R. (2016). Understanding and assessing psychopathy: Interpersonal aspects and clinical interviewing. In C. B. Gacono (Ed.) The clinical and forensic assessment of psychopathy (2nd edition). Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group: New York.

Hemphälä, M., Kosson, D. S., Westerman, J., & Hodgins, S. (2015). Stability and predictors of psychopathic traits from mid-adolescence through early adulthood among men and women treated for substance misuse in adolescence. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 56, 649–658. doi:10.1111/sjop.12257.

Wolf, R. C., Pujara, M. S., Newman, J. P., Kiehl, K. A., Decety, J., Kosson, D. S., & Koenigs, M. (2015). Interpersonal traits of psychopathy linked to reduced integrity of the uncinate fasciculus: Neural correlates of psychopathy. Human Brain Mapping, 36, 4202-4209. doi:10.1002/hbm.22911

Kosson, D. S., Neumann, C. S., Forth, A. E., Salekin, R. T., Hare, R. D., Krischer, M. K., & Sevecke, K. (2013). Factor structure of the Hare Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL: YV) in adolescent females. Psychological Assessment.

Bauer, D., Whitman, L. A., & Kosson, D. S. (2011). Reliability and construct validity of the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version in incarcerated adolescent girls. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 38, 965-987.

Brook, M., Panizzon, M. S., Kosson, D. S., Sullivan, E. A., Lyons, M. J., Franz, C. E., Eisen, S. A., & Kremen, W. S. (2010). Psychopathic personality traits in middle-aged male twins: A behavior genetic investigation. Journal of Personality Disorders, 24, 473-486.

Vitacco, M. J., & Kosson, D. S. (2010). Understanding psychopathy through an evaluation of interpersonal behavior: Testing the factor structure of the Interpersonal Measure of Psychopathy in a large sample of jail detainees. Psychological Assessment, 22, 638-649.

Kosson, D. S. (2009). Guest Editorial: Recent advances in psychopathy research. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 54, 787-790.

Sevecke, K., Kosson, D. S., & Krischer, M. K. (2009). The relationship between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder and psychopathy in adolescent male and female detainees. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 27, 577-598.

Finger, E. C., Marsh, A. A., Mitchell, D. G., Reid, M. E., Sims, C., Budhani, S., Kosson, D. S., Chen, G., Towbin, K. E., Leibenluft, E., Pine, D. S., & Blair, R. J. R. (2008). Abnormal ventromedial prefrontal cortex function in children with psychopathic traits during reversal learning. Archives of General Psychiatry, 65, 586-594.

Marsh, A. A., Finger, E. C., Mitchell, D. G., Reid, M. E., Sims, C., Kosson, D. S., Towbin, K. E., Leibenluft, E., Pine, D. S., & Blair, R. J. R. (2008). Reduced amygdala response to fearful expressions in adolescents with callous-unemotional traits and disruptive behavior disorders. American Journal of Psychiatry, 165, 712-720.

Swogger, M. T., Walsh, Z., & Kosson, D. S. (2008). Psychopathy subtypes among African American county jail inmates. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 35, 1484-1499.

Swogger, M. T., & Kosson, D. S. (2007). Identifying subtypes of criminal psychopaths: A replication and extension. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 34, 953-970.

Publications addressing other Personality Disorders

Kosson, D. S., Walsh, Z., Rosenthal, M. Z., & Lynch, T. R. (2015).  Interpersonal assessment of borderline personality disorder:  Preliminary findings. Journal of Personality Assessment, 97, 278-290. doi:10.1080/00223891.2014.983271

Rosenthal, M. Z., Kim, K., Herr, N. R., Smoski, M, J., Cheavens, J., Lynch, T. R., & Kosson, D. S. (2011). Speed and accuracy of facial expression classification in avoidant personality disorder: A preliminary study. Personality Disorders:  Theory, Research, and Treatment, 2, 327-334.

Bornovalova, M. A., Gratz, K. L., Daughters, S. B., Nick, B., Delaney-Brumsey, A., Lynch, T. R., Kosson, D., & Lejuez, C. W. (2008). A multimodal assessment of the relationship between emotion dysregulation and borderline personality disorder among inner-city substance users in residential treatment. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 42, 717-726.

Kosson, D. S., Blackburn, R., Byrnes, K. A., Park, S., Logan, C., & Donnelly, J. (2008). Assessing interpersonal aspects of schizoid personality disorder: Preliminary validation studies. Journal of Personality Assessment, 90, 185-196.

Rosenthal, M. Z., Gratz, K. L., Kosson, D. S., Lejuez, C. W., Cheavens, J. S., & Lynch, T. R. (2008). Borderline personality disorder and emotional responding: A review of the research literature. Clinical Psychology Review, 28, 75-91.