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Scot Kristian Hill, PhD

Associate Professor

Dr. Scot Kristian Hill, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology in the College of Health Professions received his Ph.D. in School Psychology from Ball State University, specializing in Clinical Neuropsychology. Dr. Hill completed Postdoctoral Fellowships in clinical neuropsychology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and the Brain Behavior Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Prior to joining RFUMS, Dr. Hill was a member of the Center for Cognitive Medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Dr. Hill’s early research focused on learning disabilities and the impact of neurodevelopmental issues on cognitive abilities. More recently, his interests lie in neurocognitive deficits associated with psychosis; the neural and cognitive bases of working memory dysfunction in schizophrenia, particularly frontostriatal communications; electrophysiological and neuropsychological markers of psychosis; intermediate phenotypes shared among psychotic disorders; and neurotransmitter regulation in psychosis (genetic and systems level). Research methods include behavioral analysis, neuropsychological testing, electroencephalography (EEG), genotype analyses, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), multivariate analyses (pattern classification, subtype identification, structural equations modeling). Research reports have appeared in several areas including Neuropsychology, Psychiatry, Neuroscience, and Psychology journals.

Honors include NIMH National Research Service Award Fellowship, NIMH Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award, and NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program Award. Dr. Hill has been the principal investigator on several extramural and foundation grants and has served as co-investigator or consultant on several projects investigating disease and treatment related effects on neuroscognition in first episode and chronic schizophrenia, shared genetic liability underlying schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and cognitive and affective dysfunction in pediatric bipolar disorder.

Research

Dr. Hill is currently involved in researching neurocognition in psychosis. Specifically, Dr. Hill has ongoing involvement in the Bipolar and Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) research group. In addition, Dr. Hill has ongoing research with his lab at Rosalind Franklin University researching working memory deficits in schizophrenia across neuropsychological, genetic, and electroencephalographic methods. The lab's most recent publication involved integration of genetic and neuropsychological assessment data in understanding serial order processing deficits across varied conditions of stimulus recall in individual's with schizophrenia.

Research Lab

Research Topics

  1. Neurocognition in psychosis
  2. Cognitive treatment effects
  3. Intermediate cognitive phenotypes 

Dr. Hill is currently involved in researching neurocognition in psychosis. Specifically, Dr. Hill has ongoing involvement in the Bipolar and Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) research group. In addition, Dr. Hill has ongoing research with his lab at Rosalind Franklin University researching working memory deficits in schizophrenia across neuropsychological, genetic, and electroencephalographic methods. The lab's most recent publication involved integration of genetic and neuropsychological assessment data in understanding serial order processing deficits across varied conditions of stimulus recall in individual's with schizophrenia.

Lab News

Graduate Student Involvement

 Maura Wolfe 
Maura is a 4th year PhD student. She received her BS from the University of Dayton with majors in Special Education and Psychology. Prior to starting at RFUMS, she worked in a lab at the University of Illinois at Chicago that was researching the mechanisms and deficits underlying late-life depression through the use neuropsychological and neuroimaging tools. She is developing her thesis on using biotypes to classify psychotic disorders, working memory and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), which is a risk-gene for working memory impairments. She ultimately wants to work with kids and adolescents so in Dr. Hill’s lab she is investigating developmental profiles of those at high risk of schizophrenia. In her free time Maura enjoys running, listening to podcasts, watching documentaries, and listening to music.

Tasha Rhoads
Tasha is a 3rd year PhD student. She received her Bachelor's degree in Psychology from Carleton College in Northfield, MN in 2012. Before joining Dr. Hill's lab, she worked as a research coordinator under Dr. Sarah Keedy and Dr. Elliot Gershon at the University of Chicago Medical Center on the BSNIP (Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network for Intermediate Phenotypes) Project collecting fMRI, EEG, and eye tracking data as well as administering neuropsychological testing batteries and recruiting participants. Her current research interests include identifying neurophysiological and neuropsychological biomarkers of psychotic disorders. In her free time, she enjoys attending concerts, sewing/knitting, cooking/baking, traveling, and gardening.

Milena GotraMilena Gotra
Milena is a 2nd year PhD student. She is assisting Maura with analyzing data for the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network for Intermediate Phenotypes (BSNIP) Project.

 

Lindsey HolbrookLindsey Holbrook
Lindsey Holbrook is a 2nd year PhD student. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from the University of Utah in 2015. Her interests include traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurorehabilitation. Before joining the lab, Lindsey worked at a concussion treatment center. In her spare time, Lindsey likes to cook/bake, spend time outside, swim, travel, watch movies, and is learning the piano.

Erin KasedaErin Kaseda
Erin Kaseda is from Salt Lake City, UT. She completed her Bachelor’s degree in neuroscience, with an honors thesis examining fMRI and cognition in adolescents with ADHD. During her undergrad she managed a behavioral medicine lab and coordinated studies on neurological pathways involved in social relationships, parasitic infection and cognition, and ambulatory blood pressure. Her clinical interests include the neurophysiological factors involved in cognitive recovery post-brain surgery. In her spare time, she enjoys hiking, petting dogs, and visiting museums.

Internship

Hayley Amsbaugh
Hayley Amsbaugh 
Hayley is currently on internship at the Bay Pines VA Health Care System in Florida. Her time in the lab included the management of SOUP data, including data extraction, coding, synthesis, and analysis.

 

 

Courtney NelsonCourtney Nelson
Courtney is currently on internship at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital. Her dissertation is focused on investigating latent constructs underlying neuropsychological and neurophysiological data.

 

 

Jenna AxelrodJenna Axelrod
Jenna is currently on internship at the VA Long Beach VA. Her time in the lab included looking at the treatment effects of antipsychotics in collaboration with the University of Chicago.

 

 

Lab Alumni

Tarra Carrathers, PhD
Tarra is a recent graduate of the lab. She completed her internship at Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children’s Hospital, and is a neuropsychology

 


William Hochberger, PhD
Will is a recent graduate of the lab. He completed his internship at the VA Long Beach and completed is on fellowship at the San Diego VA Health Care System at UCSD.

 

 

 

 

Jarett Roseberry, MS
Jarrett is a graduate of the lab. He completed his internship at the Missouri Health Sciences Psychology Consortium. He completed his fellowship at the Medical College of Wisconsin and is currently at the Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health.

 

 

 

Alison BucholzAlison Buchholz, PhD 
Alison is a recent graduate of the lab. She completed her internship at Rush University Medical Center and is on fellowship at John’s Hopkins.

 

 

Below is a picture of some of the lab members at the 2013 Midwest Neuropsychology Group Conference.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publications

Hochberger WC, Combs T, Reilly JL, Keefe RSE, Keshavan MS, Pearlson GD, Tamminga CA, Clementz BA, Sweeney JA, Hill SK. (2018). Decline from expected cognitive ability is modestly familial across psychotic disorders. Schizophrenia Research, 192, 300-307.

Nelson, C., Hill, S.K. (2018) et al. “Beneficial and Adverse Effects of Antipsychotic Medication on Cognitive Flexibility Are Related to COMT Genotype in First Episode Psychosis.” Schizophrenia Research.

Hochberger, W. C., Hill S.K., et al (2018). “P3 Amplitude Attenuation Secondary to Increases in Target-to-Target Interval (TTI) during Spatial Serial Order Recall: Implications for EEG Models of Working Memory Function.” International Journal of Neuroscience, pp. 1–22.

Shafee, R., Hill S.K., et al (2018). “Polygenic Risk for Schizophrenia and Measured Domains of Cognition in Individuals with Psychosis and Controls.” Translational Psychiatry, vol. 8, no. 1.

Combs, T. Hill S.K., et al. (2018) “Deficient Single Item Maintenance Following Intact Updating in Schizophrenia.” Schizophrenia Research, vol. 195, pp. 353–356.

Hochberger, W.C., Hill S.K., et al. (2018) “Deviation from Expected Cognitive Ability across Psychotic Disorders.” Schizophrenia Research, vol. 192, pp. 300–307.

Sheffield, J.M., Hill S.K., et al. (2017) “Transdiagnostic Associations Between Functional Brain Network Integrity and Cognition.” JAMA Psychiatry, vol. 74, no. 6, Jan. 2017, p. 605.

Eum, S. Hill S.K., et al. (2017). Cognitive Burden of Anticholinergic Medications in Psychotic Disorders.” Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 43, no. suppl_1.

Hochberger, W.C., Hill S.K., et al. (2016) “Unitary Construct of Generalized Cognitive Ability Underlying BACS Performance across Psychotic Disorders and in Their First-Degree Relatives.” Schizophrenia Research, vol. 170, no. 1, pp. 156–161.

Hanna, R.C., Hill S.K., et al. (2016) “Cognitive Function in Individuals With Psychosis: Moderation by Adolescent Cannabis Use.” Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 42, no. 6, pp. 1496–1503.

Reilly, J. L., Hill S.K., et al. (2016) “Impaired Context Processing Is Attributable to Global Neuropsychological Impairment in Schizophrenia and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder.” Schizophrenia Bulletin.

Rubin, Leah H., Hill S.K., et al. (2016) “Sex Differences in Associations of Arginine Vasopressin and Oxytocin with Resting-State Functional Brain Connectivity.” Journal of Neuroscience Research, vol. 95, no. 1-2, pp. 576–586.

Hill, S. K, et al. (2014) “Regressing to Prior Response Preference After Set Switching Implicates Striatal Dysfunction Across Psychotic Disorders: Findings From the B-SNIP Study.” Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 41, no. 4, pp. 940–950.

Ethridge, L. E., Hill S.K., et al. (2014) “Behavioral Response Inhibition in Psychotic Disorders: Diagnostic Specificity, Familiality and Relation to Generalized Cognitive Deficit.” Schizophrenia Research, vol. 159, no. 2-3, pp. 491–498.

Roseberry, JE, & Hill, SK. (2014). Limited practice effects and evaluation of expectation of change: MATRICS consensus cognitive battery. Schizophrenia Research, 159, 188-192.

Rubin, Leah H., Hill S.K., et al. (2014) “Reduced Levels of Vasopressin and Reduced Behavioral Modulation of Oxytocin in Psychotic Disorders.” Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 1374–1384.

Reilly, J. L., Hill S.K. et al. (2013) “Elevated Antisaccade Error Rate as an Intermediate Phenotype for Psychosis Across Diagnostic Categories.” Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 1011–1021.

Hill, S. K., et al. (2013) “Neuropsychological Impairments in Schizophrenia and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder: Findings from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) Study.” American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 170, no. 11, 2013, pp. 1275–1284.

Hill, S. K., Bjorkquist, O., Carrathers, T., Roseberry, J. E., Hochberger, W., and Bishop, J. (2013). Sequential Processing Deficits in Schizophrenia: Relationship to Neuropsychology and Genetics. Schizophrenia Research.

Hill, S.K., Griffin, G.B., Houk, J.C., & Sweeney, J.A. (2011). Differential effects of paced and unpaced responding on delayed serial order recall in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia research, 131, 192-197. 

Hill, S.K., Griffin, G.B., Miura, T.K., Herbener, E.S., & Sweeney, J.A. (2010). Salience of working memory maintenance and manipulation processing in schizophrenia. Psychological Medicine, 40, 1979-1986. 

Hill, S.K., Bishop, J.R., Palumbo, D, & Sweeney, J.A. (2010). The effect of second generation antipsychotics on cognition: Current issues and future challenges. Expert Reviews of Neurotherapeutics, 10(1), 43-57.

Hill, S.K., Reilly, J.L., Harris, M.S.H., Rosen, C., Marvin, R.W., DeLeon, O., & Sweeney, J.A. (2009). A comparison of neuropsychological dysfunction in first-episode psychosis patients with unipolar depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research, 113, 167-175.

Hill, S.K., Reilly, J.L., Harris, M.S.H., Khine, T., & Sweeney, J.A. (2008). Oculomotor and neuropsychological effects of antipsychotic treatment for schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 34, 494-506.

Hill, S.K., Sweeney, J.A., Hamer, R.M., Keefe, R.S.E., Perkins, D.O., Gu, H., McEvoy, J.P., & Lieberman, J.A. (2008). Efficiency of the CATIE and BACS neuropsychological batteries in assessing cognitive effects of antipsychotic treatments in schizophrenia. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 14, 209-221.

Hill, S.K., Harris, M.S., Herbener, E.S., Pavuluri, M., & Sweeney, J.A. (2008). Neurocognitive allied phenotypes of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 34, 743-759.

In press publications:

Alliey-Rodriguez N, Grey TA, Shafee R, Padmanabhan J, Tandon N, Klinger M, Spring J, Coppes L, Reis K, Keshavan MS, Gage D, McCarroll S, Bishop JR, Hill SK, Reilly JR, Lencer R, Clementz B, Buckley B, Meda S, Narayanan B, Glahn D, Pearlson G, Ivleva E, Tamminga C, Sweeney JA, Curtis D, Keedy S, Badner J, Liu C, Gershon ES. (in press). Common variants of NRXN1, LRP1B and RORA are associated with increased ventricular volumes in psychosis - GWAS findings from the B-SNIP deep phenotyping study. 

Hill SK, Keefe RSE, & Sweeney JA. (in press). Cognitive biomarkers of Psychosis. In CA Taminga, J van Os, EI Ivleva, & U Reininghaus (Eds.). Psychosis. Oxford University Press.