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Technical Standards

All applicants and students are expected to meet certain technical standards for advancement and graduation. These standards are set forth herein. In adopting these standards, the college keeps in mind the ultimate safety of its students and graduates, as well as the patients they treat. The standards reflect reasonable expectations of qualified podiatric medical students (and physicians) performing essential/required functions. Use of a trained intermediary is not acceptable.

  • Visual Observation: Candidates and students must have sufficient vision to be able to observe demonstrations, experiments and laboratory exercises in the basic sciences and performance of podiatric tasks during clinical rotations. They must be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand. Examples of courses and clinical experiences for which visual observation is required include, but are not limited to, the following: Clinical (gross), Lower Extremity and Neuroanatomy courses; Pathology, Structure and Function, Microbiology, Essentials of Clinical Reasoning, Dermatology, Radiology, Podiatric Medicine, Podiatric Surgery and Biomechanics.
  • Communication: Candidates and students should be able to speak, hear and observe in order to elicit information, examine patients, describe changes in mood, activity and posture, and perceive non-verbal They must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. Communication includes not only speech but also reading and writing. They also must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written form with all members of the healthcare team. Examples of courses and clinical experiences for which communication is required include, but are not limited to, the following: all podiatric and medical clinical experiences; clinical courses in radiology, podiatric medicine, podiatric surgery, biomechanics, neurology and general internal medicine; and physiology, lower extremity anatomy, pathology and pharmacology.
  • Motor: Candidates and students should have sufficient motor function to execute movements reasonably required to provide general care and emergency treatment to Examples of common daily treatments include palliative care of foot conditions, injection of medications such as anesthetics and anti-inflammatory medications, orthotic impressions, taking and processing of pedal radiographs, and performance of foot and ankle surgeries that include soft tissue and osseous tissue invasive and exposure-prone procedures. Examples of emergency treatment reasonably required of physicians are cardiopulmonary resuscitation, administration of intravenous medication, the application of pressure to stop bleeding, the opening of obstructed airways and the suturing of simple wounds. Such actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium and functional use of the senses of touch and vision. Examples of courses and clinical experiences for which motor skills and abilities are required include, but are not limited to, the following: Structure and Function, Podiatric Clinical Skills and Reasoning, Podiatric Surgery, Biomechanics, Podiatric Medicine and Podiatric Radiology.
  • Sensory: Because podiatric medical treatment requires enhanced ability in all sensory skills, including smell, it would be necessary to thoroughly evaluate for candidacy individuals who are otherwise qualified but who have significant tactile sensory or proprioceptive This would include individuals with significant previous burns, sensory motor deficits, cicatrix formation and limiting malformations of the upper extremities that prevent performance of essential podiatric tasks, including fulfillment of student clinical requirements. Examples of courses and clinical experiences for which sensory skills are required include, but are not limited to, the following: all clinical experiences including Essentials of Clinical Reasoning.
  • Strength and Mobility: Because podiatric medical treatment requires sufficient upper extremity strength and mobility, it would be necessary to thoroughly evaluate for candidacy individuals who are otherwise qualified but who have significant strength and mobility Mobility to attend in emergency codes and to perform such maneuvers as CPR also may be required. Examples of courses and clinical experiences for which strength and mobility are required include, but are not limited to, the following: CPR, Podiatric Surgery and Podiatric Clinical Skills and Reasoning.
  • Visual Integration: Consistent with the ability to assess symmetry, range of motion and tissue texture changes, it is necessary to have adequate visual capabilities for proper evaluation and treatment Examples of courses and clinical experiences for which visual integration is required include, but are not limited to, the following: all clinical experiences, courses in Structure and Function, Pathology, Dermatology, Radiology, Surgery, Biomechanics, Sports Medicine and Pediatric Orthopedics.
  • Intellectual, Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities: These abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis and Problem-solving, the critical skill demanded of physicians, requires all of these intellectual abilities. In addition, candidates and students should be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand the spatial relationships of structures. Examples of courses and clinical experiences for which intellectual, conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities are required include, but are not limited to, the following: courses in Structure and Function, Pharmacology, Biochemistry and all clinical courses and experiences.
  • Behavioral and Social Attributes: Candidates and students must possess the emotional health, stability and maturity required for full utilization of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and the development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients and other members of the healthcare Candidates and students must be able to tolerate physically-taxing workloads, adapt to changing environments, varying personalities, display flexibility and learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of many patients. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest and motivation are all personal qualities that will be assessed during the admissions and educational processes. Examples of courses and clinical experiences for which behavioral and social attributes are required include, but are not limited to, the following: all courses with laboratory sessions; all clinical experiences.
  • Abilities to be Involved in Invasive and Exposure-Prone Procedures: Candidates and students must be qualified to be personally and actively involved in invasive and exposure-prone procedures, without being a danger to patients, other health professionals and fellow students, while adhering to universal precautions as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Common procedures would include, but are not limited to, skin and nail debridement, skin and nail excision, as well as invasive and exposure- prone procedures such as soft tissue and osseous tissue surgical intervention. Examples of courses and clinical experiences for which abilities to be actively and personally involved in invasive and exposure-prone procedures are required include, but are not limited to, the following: general podiatric medicine, general internal medicine and general surgery, biomechanics and podiatric surgical clinical experiences.

If you have any questions about these standards or other policies as they pertain to the Americans with Disabilities Act, please contact Beth Friedman, ADA Coordinator and Director, Academic Affairs at 847-578-8482 or email elizabeth.friedman@rosalindfranklin.edu.